Contact Any Celebrity
Member Login
 

Archive for Articles

How to Hold a Celebrity Autograph Auction

Saturday, April 21st, 2012

‘A Fundraiser’s Place in Heaven’

A man knocked at the heavenly gates,
His face was scarred and old.
He stood before the man of fate
For admission to the fold.
‘What have you done,’ St. Peter asked,
‘to gain admission here?’
‘I’ve been a fundraiser, Sir,’ he said,
‘For many and many a year.’
The pearly gates swung open wide;
St. Peter rang his bell.
‘Come in and choose your harp,’ he said,
‘You’ve had your share of Hell.’

Celebrity Autograph AuctionIntroduction

Holding a celebrity autograph auction is a great way to raise funds for your organization. Celebrities love to donate autographed photos and memorabilia to worthy causes, especially if it is close to their hearts.

In this exclusive report, we’ll show you step by step how to plan, implement and hold a successful celebrity autograph auction. So get out a pen and a piece of paper to jot down notes as you get ideas, and start reading!

6 Reasons Why People Donate to Nonprofits

Marketing experts say that the most common reasons people contribute to nonprofit organizations are:

  • Wanting to feel generous
  • Wanting to change the world
  • Wanting to be compassionate
  • Wanting a sense of belonging (or acting out a sense of duty)
  • Wanting to feel well-being
  • Wanting to be recognized

Remember these six reasons when crafting your solicitation letter, making phone calls, etc.

Writing a Solicitation Letter

To begin creating your solicitation letter, write a couple of paragraph about:

  • The history of your organization
  • Services that your organization offers
  • Key accomplishments of your organization
  • Testimonials, reviews or quotes from others who have benefited from your organization

Then write about each of the following topics:

  • Your organization’s philosophy or mantra (how and why it provides service)
  • How your organization relates to or with other organizations (locally, nationally or internationally)

You can also add:

  • Photos of your organization’s work
  • Charts or maps showing your organization’s growth
  • An overview of your organization’s budget and finances, especially if they are healthy
  • Anything else that’s information about your organization, including awards received, publications it has appeared in, etc.

Finally, you must clearly state how someone can give to your organization by:

  • Donating an autographed item to be used in the auction
  • Serving as auctioneer or guest speaker at the auction
  • Contributing publicity, radio blurbs, written testimonials, etc. to help advertise and get attention for the auction and/or organization

You should also mention what the celebrity will receive after making the donation, such as:

  • A mention in your organization’s newsletter or Web site
  • A listing as a sponsor in the auction’s program
  • A coffee mug, t-shirt, award, etc. given as as token of thanks
  • Positive mentions to press by the organization about the celebrity’s help

Raising Funds by Mail

First you’ll need an accurate source of celebrity contact information like Contact Any Celebrity. Their site features a fully-searchable online database of the contact information for over 60,000 celebrities including the agent, manager, publicist, production company, attorney, business manager and charitable causes for each one.

If you can’t find the celebrity you’re looking for, they will research the celebrity for free, and let you know when the information has been updated in their database. They’ll even refund you fifty-cents for every returned letter you get in the mail, if you get any. (They employ full-time researchers who update the database daily).

The best contact to send your solicitation letter to is the celebrity’s publicist. If the celebrity doesn’t have a publicist, your next best bet is the manager, then the agent as a last resort. The publicist is the person in charge of getting the celebrity positive exposure, such as linking them with a worthy cause (yours!). The manager gives advice on career choices (and sometimes handles publicity as well). The agent, on the other hand, is only concerned with getting the celebrity paid work, such as a movie role, TV show, live appearance, book deal, etc.

Be sure to send your solicitation letter on your organization’s official letterhead. It’s also best to include a 9×12 self-addressed stamped envelope. This makes it much easier for the celebrity to respond in a timely manner. You can simply ask for an autographed photo of your organization’s auction, or you can send your own unsigned photo to be autographed (be sure to enclose a self-addressed stamped 9×12 envelope if you do this).

So how do you begin a direct-mail effort? Here’s an overview:

1. The Envelope

What will make the celebrity (or the celebrity’s assistant) want to open it? Is there an intriguing headline or a photo on it? Does it mention a free gift? The recipient’s name printed in large letters is supposed to attract attention. The use of a real stamp (even a nonprofit bulk rate stamp) makes the letter look more personal. The point is to get those envelopes opened!

2. The Letter

A direct-mail letter should be clear and timely. IT shouldn’t be melodramatic, but should generate an emotional response. To do so, include anecdotes and stories about real people (or animals, or whatever you cause is about). Combine long and short paragraphs and sentences. Follow a long paragraph with a one-liner in bold and maybe even underlined. This technique draws the reader’s attention to the points you want to emphasize.

You want readers to understand that your nonprofit has an urgent, yet reasonable and attainable goal. You want the reader to know that by joining your cause, he or she is joining a winner.

Include a P.S. after the signature. In fact, marketing experts say that most people read the P.S. before they read the opening line of the letter!

Event Budgeting

The point of holding a celebrity autograph auction is to make enough money to exceed your total cost. By a lot, you hope! But how do you make sure this happens? Below are some ideas:

It is important to start the planning process early, as much as a year before the event. You should begin writing celebrities to secure autographed items as soon as you or your committee decides that having a celebrity autograph auction is a good and profitable idea.

1. Figuring the Income Side

Try to create your celebrity autograph auction so that it produces income in more than one way. For example, sell tickets to the auction, and also sell advertising in the printed programs, sponsorships at the event, etc. Standard event income categories include:

  • Individual ticket sales
  • Table or group sales
  • Benefactor, patron or sponsor donations (for which donors receive special recognition in return for contributing higher amounts than a basic table or seat would cost)
  • Food and/or beverage sales at the event
  • Sales of goods and/or services
  • Advertising sales (in printed programs, on banners and signs, etc.)
  • Purchasing a chance (raffle ticket, door prizes, etc).

2. Capturing All Expenses

Events produce expenses in a variety of ways. A great way to save money is to try and get as many of the items below donated by local companies in exchange for a sponsor listing in your program and/or a mention at the event:

  • Building/facility/location (space rental, site use permits, security detail, portable toilets, tents, clean up costs, etc.)
  • Advertising and promotion (posters, invitations, publicity costs, postage, Web site development, etc.)
  • Production (lighting and sound equipment, technical labor, stage managers, DJs, MCs, auctioneers, etc.)
  • Travel and per diem (hotel rooms, limos, etc. for celebrities who will be making an appearance)
  • Insurance (liability in case someone should get hurt due to your organization’s negligence or shipping insurance to protect valuable donated goods)
  • Food and beverages (including permits for the sale and/or serving of alcohol, if necessary)
  • Decor (flowers, awards, tents, name tags, signs, banners, t-shirts, etc.)
  • Office expenses (letter writing, mailing list management, press release creation and distribution, postage, etc.)
  • Staff expenses (volunteers, etc.)

In spite of your careful planning, certain expenses can appear unexpectedly and can cause you to exceed your budget. If you plan to serve food at your event, keep this tips in mind so you can avoid surprise charges:

  • Confirm whether or not all service and preparation charges are included in the catering budget.
  • If you need to add additional meals at the last minute, find out what your caterer charges.
  • If meals that you ordered are not eaten, you will most likely still need to pay for them. But check to see if there’s a way out (unopened beverages, etc.)
  • If some of the wine you’ve purchased is not consumed, ask if the wine store is willing to buy it back from you.
  • If wine has been donated to your event, serving it may not be completely free. Find out whether your caterer charges ‘corkage’ fees for opening and serving it.

Non-food related expenses can sneak up on you too. Be sure to:

  • Confirm whether or not you’re expected to pay for the shipping costs of the items donated to your event.
  • Ask whether tax or deliver are included with printing costs.

Treatment of Celebrities and VIPs

Your auction depends heavily on donated goods from celebrities. Remember to treat them well so you’ll feel comfortable asking them to donate items again in the future. This not only includes sending thank you acknowledgements, but if you’re also having a celebrity serve as auctioneer, guest speaker, or entertainer, here are some other things to consider:

  • Have flowers waiting for them in their hotel room.
  • Find out in advance what foods or beverages they like to have backstage in their dressing rooms.
  • Plan in advance a place where they can get away from the crowd if they want rest and privacy.
  • Double-check your sound and lighting equipment with them to make sure they are presented under optimal conditions and so the celebrity feels comfortable.
  • If your honored guest is elderly or has a disability, double-check that any hotel, restaurant or event site is fully accessible and that all elevators and other necessary aids are working.

Again, many of items above such as flowers, food, beverages, etc. can be donated by a local company. Make sure to let the owner know that the celebrity (mention by name) will be seeing or using their product!

Picking a Date and Location

Check around your community to make sure that you’re not planning to hold your celebrity autograph auction on the same date as another nonprofit. Be sure to do this. Competing for the same audience on the same date – or even dates that are close to each other – hurts both organization’s results. Also, avoid dates that are close to holidays as most people will likely be out of town or too busy to attend.

Sample Celebrity Live & Silent Autograph Auction Timeline

Although events vary greatly in size and complexity, we recommend that you work against a six-month schedule. The following outlines a sample schedule for a celebrity autograph auction:

12-14 weeks before the auction

  • Assemble committee and co-chairs
  • Find and confirm location for event (or earlier if possible)
  • Assign subcommittee responsibilities in the following areas – securing auction items, auction operations, food and refreshments, invitations and promotions.

10-12 weeks before the auction:

  • Send letters soliciting autographed items for the auction to celebrities

8-10 weeks before the auction:

  • Write and design auction invitation
  • Do follow-up calls for auction items
  • Secure services of auctioneer
  • Solicit donated food and refreshments and/or meet with caterer
  • Begin compiling invitation list

6-8 weeks before the auction:

  • Begin writing auction program (Assign smaller auction items for silent auction, bigger items for live auction, usually no more than 10 to 12 items per live auction)
  • Send invitations to printer
  • Recruit volunteers for the following jobs: to check in guests on the night of the auction, to set up auction tables, decorate and arrange auction items, to act as big spotters for the live auction, to prepare food if not catered, to take payments after the auction, to clean up after the event.

4-5 weeks before the auction:

  • Recruit volunteers to address and mail invitations
  • Finalize your auction program to include with the invitation
  • Mail media releases to local news outlets

3-4 weeks before the auction:

  • Address and mail invitations with program
  • Make follow-up calls to potential donors of food and wine if you’re seeking them
  • Tour auction location and discuss any special requirements or potential problems

1-2 weeks before the auction:

  • Prepare bidder’s cards (assign each guest a number for use to record bids)
  • Prepare silent auction bid sheets (assign a minimum bid for each item)
  • Confirm auctioneer
  • Confirm volunteers to work on day of the event

1 week before the auction:

  • Visit venue to make final arrangements for decorating
  • Purchase decorations
  • Create attendance lists for check-in table
  • Arrange for drop-off of auction items

Day of event:

  • Deborah venue
  • Set up auction tables with silent auction items and bid sheets
  • Set up refreshment/drink tables
  • Set up check-in tables
  • Be sure volunteers are in place and understand the tasks assigned

Final checklist and tips:

  • Ask auctioneer or MC to encourage bidding on silent auction items
  • Set a firm time for closing silent auction bids and announce the time remaining at 5 minute intervals
  • Be prepared at end of auction for buyers who want to pay and receive their items all at the same time

You may think no one will rain on your parade, but you’ll want to have emergency backup plans anyway. What if your performer becomes ill, a blizzard shuts down roadways, or your permits are not approved on time? You’ll need to quickly move, replace, reschedule or cancel your program. The faster you can communicate any changes, the better your constituents will feel about sticking with you and your cause.

Issuing a Memorable Invitation

Make your invitation something that your potential guests will open and remember. Addressing the envelope by hand and using real stamps rather than a meter or printed postage makes it look more personal, and an intriguing phrase, logo or personalization on the outside gives it a greater chance of being opened. IF you can afford the increased cost, full color printing on the outside envelope can catch your guest’s eye.

What do recipients first see when the invitation is opened? Most invitations are made up of an outer fold piece, a reply card and a reply envelope. Want more attention? What if some confetti or glitter fell out of the envelope when opened? If you have a small number of invitees, roll your invitation into a small mailing tube, or even send it in a box like a gift to be opened!

Make sure that your invitation’s recipient can easily see who is extending the invitation, what time the event is, where and when it is being held, how much it costs, and how to RSVP. Print the address where you guests should respond somewhere on the reply card, even though it is also printed on the reply envelope. Sometimes pieces of the invitation become separated. You want your guest to readily know where to send his her reply.

Packaging Your Autographed Items

When it comes time for your celebrity autograph auction, make sure to package your items nicely for maximum effect. For example, cover your display table with a colorful tablecloth, sprinkle confetti on it, and prop your items up so they can be seen easily. Put your items in a cellophone wrapped gift basket, frame autographed photos in nice frames (be sure to prop them up on the table!), and package multiple items together (such as an autographed photo along with other memorabilia from the same celebrity).

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on How to Hold a Celebrity Autograph Auction

Royal Treatment

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Black Tie Optional by Harry A Freedman and Karen FeldmanIn their book, ‘Black Tie Optional,’ Harry A. Freedman and Karen Feldman explain how to use celebrities at fundraising events…

“When dealing with a celebrity, make sure all exchanges are professional. Bend over backwards to establish a good rapport. That improves the changes of getting him or her to return in future years. Celebrities who are treated very well may even lend their names to future mail campaigns and public service announcements. (Groups that want them to do this should discuss this in advance with their publicists.)

Remember that celebrities have lives of their own, too. Don’t assume that someone who has agreed to appear in a show will also attend a cocktail party or go to someone’s house for dinner with a charity representative and friends. Ask beforehand and include it in the contract. Some celebrities charge a fee for this. If the celebrity is unable to attend an additional function, ask if the star will autograph some items that can be auctioned off or used as raffle prizes.

Even if you have taken every precaution and spelled out everything in the contract, something may go amiss. The University of Miami’s Community Alliance Against AIDS discovered this when it stated ‘An Extraordinary Evening with Sophia Loren.’ This event, held on posh Williams Island, was a dinner under a tent for 600 people, and featured about 30 celebrities, including Julio Iglesias, Donna Summer, Petula Clark, and Donald O’Connor. Loren was the honoree.

In selling major donor tables (at $100,000 each), contributors were to have their photos taken with some of the celebrities. One couple wanted pictures taken with every stay, especially Loren. After dinner, the event manager waded through Loren’s fleet of bodyguards and explained that there was one couple with whom she needed to pose. She refused, saying she was still eating dinner. Later the couple was brought over to pose behind her while she remained seated, and she turned so her face wasn’t visible. While the donors nevertheless made their sizable contribution to help the charity, part of their motivation had been the picture they had been promised, to which Loren had agreed. Fortunately, these particular donors were good sports. In general, it’s wise to notify celebrities in writing that they will be expected to pose with donors.

And then there’s the issue of jewelry, which some celebrities insist upon. In many cases, local jewelers interested in the exposure will lend a particularly showy piece for the star to wear to the event. Some of the larger watchmakers, such as Tourneau and Piaget, and some jewelers might agree to donate a watch or piece of jewelry for an upscale charity event. Offer that as an in-kind honorarium for the celebrity’s appearance.

But be very careful that everyone understands the terms.

Every last detail should be in writing, as this case reported by New York Magazine illustrates: Former ‘Dynasty’ star Joan Collins was to appear at a Christian Dior party for a new men’s fragrance. Event planners had promised her some free designer items. But a few hours before the event, Collins’ assistant called the Dior people to say the star would not be attending because she’d been disappointed with the $350 saddle bag that contained beauty products valued at about $600. When the magazine contacted Collins’ assistant, she said the star had been expected to be able to pick out the items herself and that she couldn’t spare the time to attend.

Catastrophe nearly struck The Association of Fundraising Professionals’ 2006 conference at which Colin Powell was billed as one of its keynote speakers. At the last minute, he was unable to attend because he had to go to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall’s funeral. Because it was a four-day event, the group was able to reschedule Powell for the following day.

Keep in mind that some stars don’t mean to be difficult, and their refusal to do something may stem from previous bad experiences. People routinely mob stars, grabbing them and touching them. Understandably, some celebrities prefer to avoid this. Comedienne Joan Rivers, who stands a mere five feet tall, is always mobbed by her fans. When she appeared on stage in Miami after attending a crowded fundraising reception, she joked, ‘For those of you who haven’t touched me yet, I’ll be back down there in a few minutes.”

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on Royal Treatment

Harnessing Star Power

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Black Tie Optional by Harry A Freedman and Karen FeldmanIn their book, ‘Black Tie Optional,’ Harry A. Freedman and Karen Feldman explain how to use celebrities at fundraising events…

“For the group whose organizers are determined to land a big star to perform, list all those who might be interested in the charity and might also be in the vicinity around the time of the event. Then it’s time to invite them to appear. A group representative could take the usual route and call a booking agent. Don’t. He is a middleman who generally makes 10 percent or more of the amount he books the celebrity for, and so is looking to get the highest appearance fee possible. The booking agent negotiates with the agency that represents the artist. The agency also gets a percentage, so the agent there will also want to get the highest amount possible. Then the agent from the representing agency goes to the star’s personal manager, who also get s percentage…

Get the picture?

Now there are three people between the organization and the celebrity, each of whom is interested in making as much money as possible. This route ensures the organization will pay top dollar.

It’s possible and not all that difficult to reduce the number of middle-men. First, if someone in the organization knows the star, ask that person to explain to the celebrity the charitable cause and its mission. This works best if it’s a charity in which the celebrity is interested.

‘Unless the celebrity is really involved in the cause and has a personal reason to be there, I’d recommend not doing it,’ says Shelley Clark, vice-president of Lou Hammond and Associates, Inc. in New York City. ‘You’re not just buying someone’s presence.’

Charities seeking a price break will fare best by going through a celebrity’s publicist. Most celebrities have a publicist, whose job it is to get the star media exposure. The publicist gets a standard retainer, rather than a percentage of the star’s bookings. Celebrity Service lists the publicists, business mangers (for legal and accounting matters), and agents that handle each star. But even for those who don’t subscribe, there are ways to get to the star.

If a celebrity doesn’t have a publicist but appears on a network television show, that show will have a publicist. Contact the television network and ask. The network publicist can usually help make contact with the celebrity’s personal manager. All shows go on break for part of the year. Find out when that is and see if the star might be available to travel then.

That may seem a fairly straightforward process, but it’s not. A star’s personal manager is generally the toughest person to contact. Most rarely return calls to people they don’t know. Persistence is often the key to getting through. Start calling well in advance, and always leave a message. o not be rude. Politely tell the person who answers know that someone from the organization will continue to call until the person reaches the personal manager. There is an organization of personal managers that maintains a membership list. Sometimes the star’s agent can supply it.

For almost any celebrity, contact the union, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) or the American Federation of Television and Radio Actors (AFTRA). Both SAG and AFTRA have offices in New York or Los Angeles, and someone there can supply the name of the publicist or personal manager.

Having obtained the proper contact, make that call count. Persistence is more important than genius. It may take multiple calls to get through. As with personal managers, be polite. Just make it clear that someone will keep calling until they get to talk to a person who can give them an answer. Remember that publicists and managers may get as many as 500 calls a day, so there is only a minute or so to make the plea. Plan what to say. (Writing out a script is a good idea). Make the pitch concise, and make it clear what’s in it for the celebrity. Those who do their homework will mention why they know the person might want to help, and that they are in town (or nearby) the day of the event.

‘It’s not about flattery,’ says Shelley Clark. ‘I wouldn’t even talk about how much publicist there will be. Get the fit out there. Give a sense of the event, the worthiness of the cause and why you think that cause would appeal to this particular celebrity.

After getting a verbal agreement, follow it up with a formal letter of agreement, or ask for a written contract.

Ask the star’s publicist for a schedule of performances, then schedule the event around those dates. In New York City, for example, many charity events take place on Monday nights because Broadway actors are off then and thus are available for special appearances.

Just as important is to fin out what dates to avoid. Don’t schedule a sports event – or anything else, if possible – on a weekend when there’s a big game. That would be a supreme waste of star power. And check to make sure the event won’t fall on a religious holiday.

Getting a commitment that a star will appear is only half the battle. Making sure the contact doesn’t leave the group vulnerable – or committed to spending money it doesn’t have – is vital.

Thoroughly check the celebrity’s standard contract, or have a lawyer do so. IT should state that the celebrity is attending for free (or whatever the agreed upon price is) and who is paying for extras (travel, room, and food, including what will be provided for those traveling with the star). Be specific. For example, if the group does not plan to pay for long-distance phone calls, damaged hotel furniture, or room service, state this clearly in the written agreement, give a copy of the agreement to the hotel’s front desk, and request that the general manager sign it.

Do the same thing with limousine companies. Make it clear what the charity will be responsible for, and stipulate that the limo should get cash or credit cards from their customers for anything beyond that. Some entertainers are infamous for taking advantage of charities this way.

Fundraisers unfamiliar with large-scale celebrity events can make very expensive mistakes. For example, a fundraiser new to such events cost his charity money by not getting the deal in writing with the management of a hotel at which a special event was held. A few weeks after the event, when the bills came in from the hotel, there was an additional bill from room service for $4,000 in champagne and caviar – charges racked up by the backup singers of the entertainer who performed at the event. The charity paid these unanticipated expenses out of the money raised that evening, rather than harass the celebrity, who had given an excellent performance and helped attract a sell-out crowd.

TIP: Be sure that all hotel personnel – including the catering director, front desk manager, and general manager – are informed in writing as to what expenses the charity will cover.

If there are musicians involved, know that instruments the group will have to provide and how many hours of rehearsal the charity must pay for. The rider should clearly state that the entertainer is responsible for paying for any rehearsal overtime beyond what’s been agreed to.

These contracts can be mind-boggling to those unaccustomed to dealing with them. It’s easy to miss something critical. That’s why it’s worth spending the money to have an attorney review the agreement. Another option is to ask a local concert promoter to be on the planning committee to provide free advice on such matters.

After lining up the star, reduce costs by getting things donated. Some hotels will provide free accommodations, and sometimes airlines will cover tickets. (Make sure these tickets are cancelable or can be changed, because they may need to be.) Sponsors love to have their pictures taken with celebrities. If possible, get the star’s photo taken at the host hotel or with personnel from the airline sponsor.

A travel agent can be a great committee person and can assist in obtaining tickets and with complicated travel arrangements for celebrities and their entourages.

Like your mother, celebrities appreciate being met at the airport, staying at the locations they prefer, having rooms ready when they arrive, and having any special needs dealt with in advance. When Dick Clark and his wife, Kari, were to be in South America the week before the annual Bob Hope Gala of the National Parkinson Foundation in Miami, Kari asked if she could send their formal clothing in advance. The event manager picked it up. Since they were to arrive at 3 a.m., the Clarks plane to take a cab. But the event manager, who was familiar with the airport, knew he would have an easier time navigating than they would. He met the Clarks’ flight, took them right to the limo, and on to the hotel, where they had already checked them in and hung their clothes in the closet. As a result, they were able to get some much-needed sleep before the event. Kari was so pleased she wrote the event manager a note of appreciation letter.

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on Harnessing Star Power

Serious Stargazing

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Black Tie Optional by Harry A Freedman and Karen FeldmanIn their book, ‘Black Tie Optional,’ Harry A. Freedman and Karen Feldman explain how to use celebrities to help raise money for your charity…

“Lining up celebrities requires energy, persistence, and creativity. Groups most likely to convince them to appear are those in which they have a personal interest, if they are going to be in the area at the time of the event, and the organization can afford their fee (possibly through corporate underwriting).

So how to go about this? Start by watching television. Study the talk shows, entertainment news shows, and televised benefits. Stars frequently discuss their interests and upcoming schedules on ‘The Tonight Show,’ ‘Entertainment Tonight,’ and similar programs.

Read newspapers. Even the tabloids contain some news about celebrities and the causes they care about, although they may be hiding beneath the ‘Space aliens take over remote Texas town, balance budget’ stories. Many newspapers have devoted substantial space to stories about Dionne Warwick, Elton John, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, Elizabeth Taylor, and Sharon Stone, all of whom have taken active roles in AIDS-related fundraising because of the disease’s devastating impact on the entertainment industry. Katie Couric, whose husband died of colon cancer, crusades for cancer screening and awareness. Doris Day is a passionate advocate for animal welfare. Sting has spent years promoting Amnesty International’s mission. And, of course, Jerry Lewis is synonymous with the Muscular Dystrophy Association, whose telethon he hosts every year.

Don’t forget to check out the web site of specific stars as well. Just about everybody who’s anybody has an official site and it’s likely to include a section about the star’s favorite causes. Pamela Anderson‘s, for instance, has extensive information about the works she’s done with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (including a photo of her wearing nothing but a sprinkling of snow – no naughty bits showing) and a caption that reads: ‘Give fur the cold shoulder.’ Oprah Winfrey’s site includes pages on how to help capture child predators and another on the plight of women in Afghanistan. With the proliferation of Web sites, it’s easier than ever to find out what causes stars care about.

The Greater Delaware Valley Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society held a highly-successful and cost-effective celebrity event in Philadelphia when it put on ‘An Evening with Richard Cohen and Meredith Vieira: Living with MS – Impact on Families and Careers.’ Vieira, from television’s hit shows ‘The View’ and ‘Today,’ and her Emmy-Award winning author/director husband attracted a crowd of more than 1,000. Cohen was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when he was 25 years old and wrote the book, ‘Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness,’ chronicling his 30-year battle with the disease and how it’s affected his wife and three children.

The MS Society was able to offer free admission because Serono/Pfizer sponsored the program. This was a friend-raiser, rather than a fundraiser, but it’s likely that many who attended will go on to contribute time, money, or both to the organization as a result.

Bringing in a big-name speaker can help charities raise money, too, as long as the person and the topic appeal to the target audience. And, although some speakers command six-figure fees to appear, there are many well-known personalities whose speaking fees may be affordable.

One place to start would be a speakers’ bureau, such as the Greater Talent Network in New York City. The agency represents a wide range of speakers – athletes and politicians, entrepreneurs and astronauts, actors, comedians, and authors. The network’s senior vice president, Kenny Rahtz, serves as a matchmaker between the speakers and the charities.

‘It’s really about getting the appropriate celebrity and working very closely with the group to make sure the person they bring in is a magnetic draw, someone who has some connection, either personally or through family and friends, to the event,’ he said.

A speaker might help spark renewed interest in an event that’s been held annually for several years and may have lost some of its appeal. Speakers can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $300,000 plus so it’s helpful to have someone who can narrow down the possibilities. Once the charity picks a speaker, the network staff will help set up advance interviews with the media so the fundraising group’s staff can attend to the many other tasks involved. If the group opts to have a series of speakers, the network can arrange that, too, saving the charity’s staff and volunteers countless hours trying to round up likely candidates on their own.

The Internet can provide still more information about celebrities. Ticketmaster’s site offers hundreds of listings detailing which stars are touring and where they will be. Local performing art centers and arenas have Web sites that list who will be coming and when. Check the Web sites of venues within a 500–mile radius of town. See who will be appearing at these facilities, and make a season or year-long schedule of celebrities who will be in the vicinity. The costs are far smaller to bring in someone from a nearby city than from a distant coast. And make sure to check the celebrity’s Web site. It generally offers information about the star and where the person will perform over the next few months or year.

An expensive but highly useful resource is Celebrity Service, which publishes a newsletter that details the projects and appearances of countless stars. The service runs several thousand dollars per year, but might be worth the investment for groups planning several events that might include celebrities.

Another route is to consider having a speaker rather than a star-studded performance. Countless stars, athletes, news personalities, actors, and others are available through speakers’ bureaus. This strategy route is far more straightforward and less involved than bringing in celebrities to perform.”

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on Serious Stargazing

How to Line Up a Celebrity

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Black Tie Optional by Harry A Freedman and Karen FeldmanIn their book, ‘Black Tie Optional,’ Harry A. Freedman and Karen Feldman explain how to use celebrities to help raise money for your cause…

“If the group can afford to bring in a star, the next step is to decide if the time, energy, and trouble involved will pay off in the form of substantially more people attending the event and, presumably, donating more money. In most cases, the answer is yes, especially for first-time events or those competing with many others for attention.

The next step is to figure out what star will best suit the event. There are all sorts of celebrities – local sports stars an media personalities, politicians, chefs, artists, actors, authors, directors, singers, dancers. Obviously, it’s easier to get local figures to appear at an event in their hometown, an also far less expensive because there will be no airfare or lodging required. However, those who want a national or international star should think about the nature of the event and whether the person they are considering fits the occasion and overall mission.

Besides the appropriateness of the celebrity, how much the group can afford to pay will be a primary limiting factor. An entertainment budget of $3,000 will not buy mega stars such as Jennifer Lopez or Kanye West. If the event is a sports celebrity auction, for example, a modest budget may allow for the appearance of a local sports or media personality to serve as auctioneer. Then ask various sporting goods stores or teams for donations of jerseys, hats, balls, tickets, and so on. More and more local celebrities, including sports figures, command fees as much as $10,000 for appearances, autograph signings, and endorsements.

Musical acts, such as Itzhak Perlman or Bernadette Peters, can cost from $55,000 to $200,000 (add $5,000 or more for the travel expenses of staff and key musicians). Comedians such as Robin Williams, Billy Crystal, Chris Rock, and Ellen DeGeneres can cost within the same range, but with lower staff travel expenses. For stars such as Donald Trump, Jerry Seinfeld, or Oprah Winfrey, the figures climb exponentially.

For groups hoping to bring in more than one celebrity with a tight entertainment budget, try to negotiate a ‘favored nations’ clause. (A job for a lawyer). This clause ensures that if two more more stars appear, all are treated equally. They are paid the same amount, and they get the same accommodations, amenities, and billing. Sometimes the group can negotiate a lower fee because the celebrities want to work together, or because it’s a cause they support or they view it as good exposure for them.

TIP: The organization can save money if someone else has already hired the star and provided transportation. If the star must stay longer for the group’s event, the organization will then only be responsible for additional hotel expenses and possibly airfare home.”

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on How to Line Up a Celebrity

When Free Costs Money

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Black Tie Optional by Harry A Freedman and Karen FeldmanIn their book, ‘Black Tie Optional,’ Harry A. Freedman and Karen Feldman explain how to use celebrities at fundraising events…

“There’s no question that hitching a special event to a big-name star can attract attention to the cause and raise serious money. However, consider the other possible outcome: It can also spark a disaster of stellar proportions. Before deciding to tackle a celebrity event, consider the myriad hidden costs and requirements that come with it. While it’s possible it will be worth the extra effort, keep in mind that star power can create magic – or a black hole where the budget used to be.

Many celebrities are generous with their time and will agree to appear at a charitable event without charge. For a big-name star, that might mean a savings of $100,000 or more. Or does it? If the entertainment involves a professional athlete signing autographs, a comic doing standup, or a political pundit sounding forth, the logistics will be far simpler and the costs considerably less than bringing in a singer or dancer. The star may not charge for appearing, but the charity will still have to pay her 10-piece band to rehearse and perform (at $50 to $100 an hour per musician), not to mention transporting, housing and feeding everyone.

Then add in the costs of staging, lighting, sets, and props. That ‘free’ entertainment can wind up costing thousands of dollars. Again, look at the celebrity’s contract. It will contain a rider, which is a list of requirements for producing the show.

Those who have never planned a complicated celebrity concert before should spend the $500 or so to have an attorney look over the contract. It could save thousands of dollars later. Consider that stars normally have 20- to 30-page contracts, with riders listing their individual requirements for appearance. Each star’s contract also includes such things as the manner in which the must travel (usually first class); their accommodations (usually a suite); how many people travel in their entourage (anywhere from one to 30, including makeup artists, hairdressers, personal valets, musicians, tour managers, reiki masters, and psychics); the entourage’s travel and lodging requirements; what meals must be provided and what foods should be served; cancellation clauses; and anything else the star requires. Make sure the attorney who examines the contract is familiar with entertainment and contract laws. Another option: Ask the business manager of a regional theater to review it.”

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on When Free Costs Money

Finding a Celebrity to Endorse Your Product

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Double My Revenues in 12 Months or Less by Dennis Morales FrancisIn his book, ‘Double My Revenue in 12 Months or Less,’ Dennis Morales Frances explains how to find a celebrity to endorse your product…

“Finding the right celebrity to endorse your product can often increase response to your marketing by 100% or more. Most cost-effective is to have a well-respected celebrity who is semi-retired. For example, we were able to get a member of ‘The Partridge Family’ to endorse a product of a client of mind for a few thousand dollars, and it’s made the difference between stunning success and failure for the campaign.

Very often you can sign for an entire year celebrities (movie stars, Hall-of-Fame athletes, etc.) who are not current box office superstars, but were at one time and are still very known and respected, for $20,000. Good celebrity brokers include Celeb Brokers and Celebrity Endorsement Network.

And often you can just do-it-yourself by using a directory called Contact Any Celebrity.

If just 2% of the 1,000 celebrities you write send back the authorization form giving you permission to list the celebrity as a ‘Friend of [Org Name]’ on the letterhead and website, you then have a list of 20 celebrities you can list as friends (with photos) in direct mail solicitations, on the website and other promotional material. This will usually increase response to your mailing 50%-100% or even more.

The key to success here is to pick celebrities (usually older celebrities) who people respect and admire. Michael Jackson, Mike Tyson and Michael Vick (the three ‘Michaels’) are well-known, but would not be good choices. But baseball great Cal Ripken would be good for many products because of his wholesome all-American image.

You also want the celebrity endorser to fit the product – i.e. Kirstie Alley’s endorsement of Jenny Craig’s weight-loss program (assuming she does not balloon out again). The endorsement needs to make sense.

Free 7-Day Trial on All Memberships!

Annual VIP Membership
$197/year
(most popular - best rate)
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
VIP Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Cancel Anytime
Priority VIP Service
Best Rate - No Monthly Charges
Monthly (Basic) Membership
$47/month
Free 7-Day Full Trial
Celebrity Contacts Database Access:
59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures
14,000+ Representatives
(Agent, Manager, Publicist & Attorney)
7,300+ Entertainment Companies
USPS-Verified Mailing Addresses
Representation Email Addresses
Unlimited Celebrity Searches
Private Online Database
Dynamic Lookup Technology
Lightning-Fast Hosted by Amazon
Cross-Referenced Results
Daily Database Updates
Member Concierge
Free Research Requests
Postage Refunds
Celebrity Causes Database
Free E-Books:
Celebrity Leverage
Help From Hollywood
Secrets to Contacting Celebrities
100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Monthly Insider Expert Teleseminars
Basic Support
Cancel Anytime
 

Contact 59,200+ Celebrities & Public Figures Now!



5-Minute Database Demo:

Activate Your FREE 7-Day Trial!

Categories : Articles
Comments Comments Off on Finding a Celebrity to Endorse Your Product